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We Hold These Truths to Be Self Evident

This version was saved 6 years, 1 month ago View current version     Page history
Saved by Mr. Hengsterman
on October 17, 2016 at 11:58:49 am
 

The Evolution of the American Character
 
The Declaration of Independence, 1776 

 


Portrait of George Washington, 1772

 

 

1775

January 1775 - The Conciliatory Resolution

March 1775 Give me Liberty, or Give me Death!

April 19 – Lexington and Concord Major John Pitcairn sent to seize military supplies at Concord; Paul Revere, William Dawes and Dr. Sam Prescott went to warn the minutemen; Minutemen and British soldiers collide at Lexington and Concord

May 10 – Ethan Allen and the Green Mtn. Boys take Ft. Ticonderoga

May 12 – Ethan Allen and the boys take Crown Pt.

June 15 – The Second Continental Congress appts. George Washington Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army
June 17 – Bunker Hill/ Breed’s Hill: Colonials survived two attacks but ran out of ammunition and were defeated; 050 British dead only 350 colonial dead Significance: Colonials hung in against the best Britain had to offer – we could win this war

July 1775 The Olive Branch Petition

Aug – Dec – Expedition against Quebec Gen. Richard Montgomery invaded Canada and forced the British to leave Montreal; Benedict Arnold joined Montgomery and together they went after Quebec  Major Failure Montgomery killed - Arnold wounded - 1/3 of troops captured or killed

 

 

 

 

Thomas Paine Common Sense idea of republicanism, the language of the pamphlet 

 

In clear, simple language it explained the advantages of and the need for immediate independence. It was published anonymously on January 10, 1776. Common Sense presented the American colonists with an argument for freedom from British rule at a time when the question of whether or not to seek independence was the central issue of the day.

 

Paine wrote and reasoned in a style that common people understood. Forgoing the philosophical and Latin references used by Enlightenment era writers, he structured Common Sense as if it were a sermon, and relied on Biblical references to make his case to the people. He connected independence with common dissenting Protestant beliefs as a means to present a distinctly American political identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Declaration of Independence Timeline

 

June 7 – Richard Henry Lee - –Introduced the resolution: “That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states.”

June 11 – The Committee of Five    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0_3KzuYuh0


Benjamin Franklin,  John Adams, Robert R. Livingston,  Roger Sherman –Thomas Jefferson (Chosen to do the actual writing)

 

 

 

 

 

The Preamble

Introduction explaining that separation has become necessary to preserve natural law & natural rights. 

 

Theory of democratic government - 4 Fundamental Principles:

#1 We have “unalienable rights” including “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness”

#2 Government is a Compact (contract) theory of government

#3 Intro Doctrine of popular sovereignty – power comes from the people

#4 Right/duty of people to revolt to “throw off such Government” that is guilty of “a long train of abuses & usurpations”

 


The List of Greviences (27):
 

Attack on King George III  listing all the things he has done that have violated their natural rights and rights as Englishmen

 

Ends with the Actual Declaration are now “Free and Independent States”  This amounts to a formal declaration of war   

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNOTozVp_i4

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrvpZxMfKaU

HBO's John Adams - The vote on the Declaration, 1776

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immediate Effect: Revolution & establishment of a new nation!!

 

 


South Carolina votes on the Levy, 1776

 

 

Long-Term Effects: Committed America to carry out the highest political ideals of the age     Jefferson: “An expression of the American mind.”

The DOI’s message of “equality” has continued to serve as a model for other societies even though America has struggled with the concept itself (racism; sexism; etc.)

 

 

 


 

 

Men of the Declaration
Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

 

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

 

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War. They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor. What kind of men were they?

 

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated.

 

But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

 

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

 

Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

 

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton. At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

 

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

 

John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died from exhaustion.

 

Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates. Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These men were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means and education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/embed/uZfRaWAtBVg

Also draws international attention from potential allies Who? •Why?

 

 

Men of the Declaration

Something to Remember this 4th Of July

 

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before  they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their  sons  serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of  the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.  They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred  honor. What kind of men were they? 

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were  farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated.  But  they  signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.  Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships  swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties  to  pay his debts, and died in rags. Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
 family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his  family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and  poverty  was his reward. Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery,  Hall,  Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton. At the  battle  of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson Jr, noted that the British General Cornwallis  had  taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General  George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died  bankrupt. Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.  The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months. John Hart  was  driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled  for  their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more  than  a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead  and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died from exhaustion. Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates. Such were the stories and  sacrifices of the American Revolution. These men were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means and education.  They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this declaration, with  firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."  They gave you and me a free and independent America. The history books
 never  told you a lot about what happened in the Revolutionary War. We didn't  fight  just the British. We were British subjects at that time and we fought our
own government! Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but  we  shouldn't.  So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and  silently  thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.  Remember: freedom is never free!  I hope you will show your support by please sending this to as many people as you can. It's time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball

games.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Preamble to the Declaration of Independence, 1776

 

All men are created equal. They are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."  This immortal statement was made in the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America in 1776. In a broader sense, this means: All the peoples on the earth are equal from birth, all the peoples have a right to live, to be happy and free.  The Declaration of the French Revolution made in 1791 on the Rights of Man and the Citizen also states: "All men are born free and with equal rights, and must always remain free and have equal rights."

 

Preamble to the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence, 1945

 

 

 

 

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